Good Books

Photo: Jane Ussher

Good Books

A new chapter in the fight against inequality

Oxfam and Good Books have teamed up to offer readers a very simple offer: every time you buy from Good Books, all the profit goes directly to fund projects in partnership with Oxfam.

This money funds projects that provide clean water, sanitation, develop sustainable agriculture and create access to education. So as you buy, you are actively supporting communities in need. Take a look at what you've helped us to achieve by supporting Good Books.

You & Oxfam

If you like the work that Good Books is funding and would like to do more, sign up to become a become a regular Oxfam donor. Make sure you visit our You & Oxfam pages to take direct action against poverty.

Good Books and Oxfam in East Timor

Oxfam has helped to establish gravity-fed systems in Mauubo B community, Liquica District.

Safe water and sanitation

In East Timor 42% of people live without access to clean water. Here project funds from Good Books are being used to improve access to clean water, to reduce water-borne disease and to help find long term solutions to water and sanitation problems. Community water and sanitation groups have been set up to help educate others in the community about health and hygiene.

The advent of safe drinking water in villages has dramatically reduced the time that women have to travel to collect water, leaving them more time – both to spend with their families, and to earn income from other sources. It is because you support Good Books that we have been able to contribute to providing clean fresh water for more villages in East Timor.

Livelihoods

Decades of strife followed by the devastating violence unleashed following East Timor’s vote for independence from Indonesia have left East Timor as one of the poorest countries in Asia. Despite peace and independence the new nation faces a multitude of challenges, including chronic malnutrition and rural poverty.

With the help of Good Books, work is being undertaken with impoverished rice farmers to reinvigorate farming life. By supporting the formation of farmer cooperatives, providing training in sustainable farming techniques and in marketing, returns for many families have improved tenfold.

Not only has this allowed families to send their children to school and afford the essentials of life, the increased production has had flow on benefits for a country struggling to feed itself.

The Young Women in Leadership programme aims to train young womenm to be able to inform and influence their peers on issues such as reproductive rights and building self-confidence, as well as how to deal with discrimination.

Good Books and Oxfam in Fiji

In Fiji there is a real need to bring about positive change for women’s political and socio-economic status. Oxfam New Zealand has been working with Fiji Women’s Rights Movement since 1993 to raise awareness of women’s rights amongst both women and men in Fiji through a combination of research, legal advice, advocacy training and literacy programmes – and to bring about changes in policies and behaviours as a result.

As Fiji moves towards democracy, FWRM has a crucial role to play in advocating for strong human rights and in training a new generation of women leaders.

Project funds from Good Books are helping FWRM to scale up its training for young women leaders, play and active role in defending human rights and continue to promote women’s rights in law and practice in Fiji.

Young leaders

Good books funding is supporting FWRM’s Young Women in Leadership programme. This life changing programme trains young women between the ages of 14 and 25 to be able to inform and influence their peers on issues such as reproductive rights and how to deal with multiple forms of discrimination.

The programme is helping young women to build confidence and self-belief so they are encouraged to enter into positions of influence and leadership, whether in their schools, communities, churches, youth groups and political groups.

Good Books and Oxfam in Solomon Islands

Children at an over-crowded school in
the Solomon Islands. Oxfam is working to
improve the quality of primary education.

Education

Imagine being unable to read or write. This is the reality for many in the Solomon Islands, where years of civil unrest have left many families too poor to send their children to school.

And all too often it’s girls who miss out. When parents can’t afford to send all of their children to school they often keep their daughters at home. In fact over two-thirds of children out of school world-wide are girls.

Through Good Books support, work has been undertaken with 11 primary schools in the province of Malaita to create positive change. The voice and involvement of the community is essential for children to receive a good education, so work has been undertaken with parents and local people to support teachers, train school boards and to advocate for government money to be used wisely. This ensures that the improvements and new opportunities take root, and are here for years to come.

Good Books and Oxfam in Vanuatu

Safe water and sanitation

In Vanuatu less than half of people living in rural villages have access to clean drinking water. As well as the work of Oxfam and others to develop safe water supplies in individual communities, a larger scale approach was needed to address the problem.

When the Government of Vanuatu approached Oxfam to develop a rural water strategy for the country, Good Books contributed the funding needed to develop the plan; an important step in a long term solution for communities all over Vanuatu.

Good Books and Oxfam in Papua New Guinea: Bougainville

Water for Survival: bringing clean water, hygiene and sanitation to Bougainville.

Safe water and sanitation

Dissatisfaction and anger in Bougainville, an Island province of PNG, boiled over into a devastating civil war which lasted from1989 to 1998. Some analysts believe this was the deadliest conflict of the 20th century on a per capita basis, as tens of thousands of lives were lost and much of the public infrastructure on the island was destroyed. Whole communities were displaced and traumatised.

Most people live in rural areas, and very few have a safe water supply. Instead, many rely on streams that are contaminated with human, animal and mining waste. This means that children suffer from water–borne diseases, and cases of severe diarrhoea are common. Women walk long distances to collect water every day, sometimes two to three hours per day, meaning they have little time and less energy for other income-generating activities.

Good Books funding is not only is bringing much needed water and sanitation, but is also bringing communities together to work co–operatively and build peace. An external evaluation in 2004 found that Oxfam projects had played a major part in building peace in central Bougainville – work that Good Books customers have now helped support.

Good Books and Oxfam in Tanzania

Safe water and sanitation

Despite being surrounded by three of Africa’s largest lakes, water in Tanzania is scarce. There are nearly 37 million people in Tanzania and 70% of them do not have access to safe drinking water. In rural areas women and children often have to walk many kilometres every day just to get to the nearest water source.

Funding from Good Books was targeted to help increase access to clean water for these communities. Eleven hand pumps were installed in rural villages, and pump attendants trained to maintain them – providing clean water to 3300 people. In addition teachers were trained in educating their communities about good hygiene practices.

These simple but radically effective initiatives have led to a huge reduction in water borne diseases and increased attendance at local schools – because these children now no longer have to spend hours every day walking to fetch water. By supporting Good Books you have been part of making this happen: healthier, communities and happier children.

You & OxfamIf you like the work that Good Books is funding and would like to do more, sign up to become a become a regular Oxfam donor. Make sure you visit our You & Oxfam pages to take direct action against poverty.