Latest Fairtrade documents

May 27, 2013

Bananas sold by Dole in New Zealand carry a sticker that says “Ethical Choice”. This research report undertaken by Philippines research organisations and released by Oxfam New Zealand, suggests that the treatment of workers on Dole’s Philippine banana plantations is anything but ethical. These are the plantations that supply bananas for the New Zealand market.

July 18, 2012

Every time you open your fridge and food cupboards, you step into the global food system. Sounds odd, but it’s true. The system is an enormously complex web of all the people, businesses, organisations and governments involved in the production, distribution, sale and consumption of food. Irrespective of who we are, or where we are on the planet, the food we eat is made available by this global food system.

April 1, 2010

While the market for Fairtrade in New Zealand is still relatively small it has experienced very healthy and sustained growth since its beginnings in 2004. Initially nine companies were involved in selling Fairtrade coffee and tea. Retail sales reached NZ$261,050 in 2004 and in 2008 the New Zealand Fairtrade market growth in was 69 per cent. By 2009, the number of New Zealand companies licensed to sell Fairtrade products increased to 51 and their combined retail sales topped NZ$17.5 million. This growth in Fairtrade retail sales is great news for small-scale farmers and workers in developing countries. Increased Fairtrade sales means that more trade is taking place under Fairtrade conditions and that more farmers and workers are receiving the economic, social and environmental benefits of Fairtrade. This report has been produced by Fairtrade Labelling Australia & New Zealand (FLANZ) and Oxfam New Zealand. Analysis has covered the period of New Zealand Fairtrade purchases and sales from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009.

May 1, 2009

The New Zealand Fairtrade market has experienced very healthy and sustained growth since its beginnings in 2004. Initially nine companies were involved in selling Fairtrade coffee and tea. Retail sales reached NZ$261,050 in 2004. By 2008, the number of New Zealand companies licensed to sell Fairtrade products increased to 42. Their combined retail sales topped NZ$10.5 million. Fairtrade products currently available in New Zealand are: coffee, tea, chocolate, cocoa and cotton.

This growth in Fairtrade retail sales is great news for small-scale farmers and workers in developing countries. Increased Fairtrade sales means that more trade is taking place under Fairtrade conditions and that more farmers and workers are receiving the economic, social and environmental benefi ts of Fairtrade.

January 23, 2009

Power and possibilities within the cocoa and chocolate sector

December 1, 2002

Next time you sip on a flat white pause to think about what you're drinking: the global fall in coffee prices has been catastrophic for many living in the developing world. Farmers, mostly poor smallholders, are selling their coffee for much less than in the past, and struggling to provide for their families. This report sets out the roots of the coffee crisis and explains the volatility in the markets . It also lays out a Coffee Rescue Plan, a series of recommendations designed to uplift coffee producers by creating a more stable market with the help from consumers, coffee producers, the World Bank and governments.

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