Turn the page on poverty

2002 Reports

December 2, 2002
It is critical that HIV/AIDS are addressed on a sector-wide basis by NGOs and government agencies. This report provides practical guidance on how to integrate HIV/AIDS issues into organisational planning. It sets out the need for organisations to anticipate, minimise and cope with the effects of HIV in the workplace, as well as how to best plan when colleagues and clients are affected by HIV, be it attending funerals or taking time off for treatment. Finally, it emphasises the need for organisational planning to have strong links with HIV interventions: prevention, treatment and care.
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December 1, 2002

Next time you sip on a flat white pause to think about what you're drinking: the global fall in coffee prices has been catastrophic for many living in the developing world. Farmers, mostly poor smallholders, are selling their coffee for much less than in the past, and struggling to provide for their families. This report sets out the roots of the coffee crisis and explains the volatility in the markets . It also lays out a Coffee Rescue Plan, a series of recommendations designed to uplift coffee producers by creating a more stable market with the help from consumers, coffee producers, the World Bank and governments.

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December 1, 2002

Europe's cows receive over $2 a day in subsidies - more than the income of over half the world's population. EU taxpayers pay €2.5bn each year to support the dairy industry through a regime that destroys people's livelihoods in some of the world's poorest countries. EU surpluses of milk and milk products are dumped on world markets using costly export subsidies, undermining developing-country markets. Dairy processing and trading companies are the direct beneficiaries of these subsidies. Meanwhile, many small-scale European dairy farmers are struggling to make ends meet. Oxfam is calling for an immediate end to EU dairy export dumping and for agricultural support to target small scale farmers.

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November 1, 2002

This report looks at HIV/AIDS, poverty and gender, and focuses on young girls and old women. It starts with some basic facts about HIV/AIDS, and then provides a framework for analysing vulnerability to the infection and to its impact, in relation to gender and age. It briefly outlines institutional responses, and ends up with conclusion and recommendations for development planners to combine gender and age analysis in any development or humanitarian work.

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November 1, 2002

Agricultural trade could play a key role in the fight against poverty. But in practice the rules which govern world agricultural trade benefit the rich rather than the poor. Rich countries spend vast sums of money protecting the interests of their producers, while at the same time forcing poor countries to open their markets to subsidised imports. Achieving an equitable outcome from the WTO agricultural negotiations will be a litmus test of the so-called Doha Development Round. Developing countries should not sign a new agricultural agreement if their vital development needs are not adequately addressed.

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September 9, 2002

Oxfam is deeply concerned about the appalling toll being paid by the civilian population on both sides of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. The recent escalation of the conflict has created a serious humanitarian crisis for the Palestinian population living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. New research by Oxfam and its partners on the impact of the Israeli government’s policy of closure finds thousands of rural households in the West Bank on the brink of destitution. Away from the media spotlight, the families of farmers, unemployed labourers and small businessmen in these often neglected Palestinian villages have run out of savings and sold off land and livestock.

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January 1, 2002

There is no doubt that abhorrent acts of September 11, and the international response, has significantly changed the western world’s most commonly held views on peace, security and justice.  There is now a much greater understanding and sensitivity to the deep structural imbalances and historic animosities that fuel violence and extremism. But as stated by Kofi Annan, September 11 did not change the world.  In most ways, and for the vast majority of people, the world today looks very similar to how it looked on September 10 2001. What has changed since September 11 is the political context for international action, and the prospects for addressing some of the underlying and chronic imbalances that continue to undermine global security.  Oxfam and International Actions's Ten Point Plan proposes taking concrete steps that show real progress on issues including the rebuilding of Afghanistan, ending profiteering from war and discrimination against women. To do otherwise would risk exacerbating the tensions that continue to undermine global security and prosperity.  

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