Turn the page on poverty

Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

For decades Oxfam has campaigned for trade rules and intellectual property standards that give poor countries a fair deal, such as protecting their right to access affordable medicines for public health. Despite mass public mobilisation against it, the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) was signed in October 2015. We believe the deal sets a dangerous precedent for democracy, transparency and future trade agreements.
 
Oxfam joined a High Court case asking the New Zealand Government to release the secret text before it was signed. We also highlighted the potential harm the TPPA could bring in terms of poor people being able to access life-saving medicines, governments being accountable to the will of their people, and multinational corporations challenging government laws to protect public health and the environment.

In December 2013, 26,000 signatures were handed in, calling for release of the draft text. Then in August 2015 a petition of 100,000 signatures was delivered to Parliament.

 

Public pressure is building on the government to walk away from the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. During a rally...

Posted by Oxfam NZ on Tuesday, 11 August 2015

 

Latest news

Court action to challenge secret trade negotiations

August 5, 2015

Oxfam joins others in the High Court to challenge the secrecy of TPPA documents.

Barry Coates: Release the TPP negotiation documents

February 24, 2014

An opinion piece from Oxfam's Executive Director Barry Coates, as published in the New Zealand Herald on February 21, 2014

Growing international call for transparency in TPPA negotiations

February 20, 2014

In the lead-up to the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) negotiations in Singapore February 22-25, Oxfam New Zealand is calling on the New Zealand Trade Minister, Tim Groser to end the secrecy and make negotiating drafts publicly available. The scope of the TPPA is wide ranging and will be significant for generations to come, not just in New Zealand but particularly for poor and marginalised people in the developing world.