Education can end malnutrition

Turn the page on poverty


November 26, 2015

There is likely to be a climate deal in Paris. The emission pledges that more than 150 governments have put on the table this year show that global climate ambition is increasing. But much more is needed, as it’s a deal that could still lead to around 3°C of warming.

October 27, 2015

On April 25, 2015, Nepal was struck by a massive 7.6 magnitude earthquake that left nearly 9,000 people dead and destroyed or damaged more than 850,000 homes. Many of the affected people have received some support from the Government of Nepal and aid organisations, but others are still waiting for assistance. The government’s response has been beset by delays, and for the past month the country has been in the grip of a fuel crisis. 

October 7, 2015

Action needed on aid, refuge, and to end the bloodshed

The arrival of tens of thousands of Syrians to Europe’s borders and the shocking deaths of women, children and men on their perilous journey has been a sharp reminder to the international community of the tragedy engulfing the people of Syria. Syrians put themselves and their families at so much risk only out of sheer desperation.

October 1, 2015

Millions of poor people in the Pacific face hunger and poverty this year and next because of droughts and erratic rains as global temperatures reach new records, and because of the onset of a powerful El Niño – the climate phenomenon that develops in the tropical Pacific and brings extreme weather to several regions of the world. The combination of record warmth one year followed by an El Niño the next is unique and the climatic implications are uncertain. If 2016 follows a similar pattern, we are entering uncharted waters.

September 7, 2015

Why Australia and New Zealand must heed the Pacific’s calls for stronger action on climate change. A report for the 46th Pacific Islands Forum Leaders Meeting, Port Moresby, September 2015.

June 8, 2015
Climate change is already affecting what we all eat, and is the biggest threat to winning the fight against hunger. Coal is the biggest single cause of climate change, yet industrialised countries are still burning huge amounts, despite efficient, affordable, renewable alternatives being available. Coal power stations in the G7 countries alone emit twice as much fossil fuel CO2 as the whole of Africa.
We can only afford to burn 20 per cent of coal reserves if we want to keep warming below 2°C – and even less to keep it to the safer level of 1.5°C. Already at the current warming of 0.85°C over pre-industrial times, vulnerable communities, including our Pacific neighbours, are struggling to cope with more fierce storms, floods and droughts. Cyclone Pam has been a sobering example, decimating crops and causing hunger on a wide scale across Vanuatu and beyond. 
Olivier De Schutter, Former UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food (2008–14): "Coal-fired power stations increasingly look like weapons of destruction aimed at those who suffer the impacts of changing rainfall patterns as well as of extreme weather events."
April 13, 2015

In 2014, after unprecedented destruction and suffering in Gaza, international donors pledged $3.5bn and a change in approach. Six months later, reconstruction and recovery have barely begun, there has been no accountability for violations of international law, and Gaza remains cut off from the West Bank.
This paper outlines an achievable course of action to address the root causes of the recurrent conflict and put international engagement with Gaza on the right course.

January 19, 2015

Global wealth is increasingly being concentrated in the hands of a small wealthy elite. These wealthy individuals have generated and sustained their vast riches through their interests and activities in a few important economic sectors, including finance and pharmaceuticals/healthcare. Companies from these sectors spend millions of dollars every year on lobbying to create a policy environment that protects and enhances their interests further.

January 13, 2015

On 12 January 2010, a massive earthquake hit Haiti’s capital Port-au-Prince, killing 220,000 people, injuring 300,000 and severely damaging great swaths of the city. While enormous challenges remain as the country continues its recovery, Oxfam is committed to helping Haitians and their government to build a stronger, more resilient nation.

December 19, 2014

The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was a pivotal moment for the humanitarian sector; many lessons were learned and the humanitarian system was strengthened as a result. However, ten years on, significant challenges remain.

Using the case of the tsunami – a rare example of a well-funded humanitarian emergency – this report looks at key lessons from the response and examines why some emergencies receive rapid, generous funding while others remain virtually ignored by the international community.